Lauren Rinaldi's work lives in the space where objectification, female power, and sexual empowerment intersect and blur. She uses oil paintings, mixed media drawings and sketches as her vehicles to explore ideas about intimacy, gaze, body-image, sexuality and self-identity. She looks to the women in her life for inspiration and works to weave their experiences with her own to create a shared narrative. While Rinaldi’s portraits are often modeled after her own body, they communicate stories of universal importance in our contemporary moment. Focusing closely on particular regions of the body––legs, heads, torsos––Rinaldi detaches the image from the self-portrait, instead offering psychological representations that manifest societal pressures that affect her as a woman, particularly as an artist, mother and civic leader. Through observing the nature of women seeking affirmation under the guise of anonymity online, she also is informed by the influence social media has on female identity and how detachment from the depictions of the reality of the self affects and reveals who women desire to be.

Lauren Rinaldi (b. 1983, Brooklyn, NY) is an American artist living and working in Philadelphia, PA. She studied painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art, where she earned her BFA in 2006. Since then, her solo shows have included Still Standing (2018); Hunger of the Cheeky Sisters (2015); At Arm’s Length (2014); and An Accidental Masterpiece (2011), all at Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia and she has exhibited her work extensively in group shows throughout Philadelphia and the US. In addition to her active studio practice, Lauren is a mother, a yoga teacher, and an activist.

"Rinaldi’s images provide a mysterious woman and want for narrative, but without conclusion, giving comment on woman’s many deemed roles, challenging viewers to move beyond stereotypes and first impressions."

Sally Deskins

Les Femmes Folles Art

(Up the Staircase Quarterly TALES exhibition review)

 

"Rinaldi explores our seemingly embraced imperfections – using layers to thinly veil what she consciously chooses to hold back – projecting an identity with the allure of control all the while revealing to the viewer the truths we unwittingly hide from ourselves."

Ginger Rudolph

HaHa Magazine and Art Nerd New York

(HaHa Magazing 'At Arm's Length' review)

© 2013 by Lauren Rinaldi. All rights reserved.